The Broken Estate Essays On Literature And Belief Pdf

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Works by or about James Wood, English critic and writer.

Books[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Wood, James (2003). The book against God. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 
  • Upstate (2018)

Non-fiction[edit]

  • Wood, James (1999). The broken estate : essays on literature and belief. New York: Random House. 
    • Bulgarian edition: Wood, James (2010). Kak dejstva literaturata. Kralica Mab. 
  • — (2004). The irresponsible self : on laughter and the novel. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 
  • — (2008). How fiction works. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 
  • — (2012). The fun stuff. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 
  • — (2015). The nearest thing to life. Brandeis University Press. 

Essays, reporting and other contributions[edit]

  • Wood, James (March 15, 2010). "Keeping it real". The Critics. A Critic at Large. The New Yorker. 86 (4): 71–75. Retrieved 2011-01-16.  Reviews Lee, Chang-Rae (2010). The Surrendered. 
  • — (August 15, 2011). "Secularism and its discontents". The Critics. A Critic at Large. The New Yorker. 86 (4): 71–75. Retrieved 18 November 2011. 
  • — (November 7, 2011). "Shelf life". Personal History. The New Yorker. 87 (35): 40–43. Retrieved 2014-10-16. 
  • — (December 19–26, 2011). "Reality effects". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 87 (41): 134–138. Retrieved 12 September 2013.  Discusses John Jeremiah Sullivan's essays.
  • — (April 8, 2013). "Youth in revolt : Rachel Kushner's The flamethrowers". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 89 (8): 78–82. Retrieved 2015-12-23. 
  • — (July 22, 2013). "Sins of the father". The Critics. A Critic at Large. The New Yorker. 89 (21): 70–74. Retrieved 2014-10-30. 
  • — (August 5, 2013). "All my sons : a novel of privilege, patrimony, and the literary life". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 89 (23): 73–75. David Gilbert's & Sons.
  • — (October 21, 2013). "The new curiosity shop : Donna Tartt's 'The Goldfinch'". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 89 (33): 100–102. 
  • — (October 20, 2014). "No time for lies : rediscovering Elizabeth Harrower". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 90 (32): 90–94. Retrieved 2014-12-23. 
  • — (May 4, 2015). "Circling the subject : Amit Chaudhuri's novel Odysseus Abroad". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 91 (11): 73–75. Retrieved 2015-07-03. 
  • — (March 21, 2016). "Floating island : Haitian happenings in Mischa Berlinksi's Peacekeeping". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 92 (6): 96–98. 
  • — (October 10, 2016). "Male gaze : David Szalay's 'All that man is'". The Critics. Books. The New Yorker. 92 (32): 98–101. [1]

Introductions, forewords etc.[edit]

  • Selected Stories of D. H. Lawrence (Modern Library, 1999)
  • Collected Stories of Saul Bellow (Penguin, 2002)
  • The Golovlyov Family by Mikhail Evgrafovich Saltykov (New York Review Books, 2001)
  • The Heart of the Matter by Graham Greene (Penguin, 2004)
  • Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy (Modern Library, 2001)
  • The Woodlanders by Thomas Hardy (Modern Library, 2002)
  • The Myth of Sisyphus by Albert Camus (Penguin Modern Classics, 2000)
  • La Nausée by Jean-Paul Sartre (Penguin Modern Classics, 2000)
  • Novels 1944-1953: Dangling Man, The Victim, The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow (Library of America, 2003)
  • Austerlitz by W.G. Sebald (Penguin, 2011)
  • The Book of Common Prayer (Penguin, 2012)
  • Caught by Henry Green (New York Review Books, 2016)

Notes[edit]

External links[edit]

Reviews of How Fiction Works
  1. ^Online version is titled "Nine tales of crises in 'All that man is'".

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The Broken Estate: Essays on Literature and Belief

James Wood, Author Random House (NY) $24 (288p) ISBN 978-0-375-50217-0
At a mere 33 years old, Wood has produced an unlikely and brilliant first book collecting his reviews (from the New Republic, where he is the full-time book critic, the London Review of Books and elsewhere). Neither a programmatic study nor a grab bag of occasional work, these 21 pieces give a compelling account of modern fiction that is as conscientious as it is idiosyncratic, adducing a gallery of personal heroes (Herman Melville, Nikolay Gogol, Anton Chekhov, Virginia Woolf, W.G. Sebald), of more-or-less villains (Ernest Renan, George Steiner, Toni Morrison, John Updike, Julian Barnes) and of great in-betweeners (Thomas More, T.S. Eliot, Gustave Flaubert, Philip Roth). Like Woolf's reviews, which he praises eloquently, Wood's really are essays, the incisive, beautifully turned workings of a literary mind. Even before the final, title piece, which links Wood's childhood in an evangelical Anglican family to his religious preoccupations, the book reveals a reader whose prejudices are as interesting as his conclusions, and whose radical Protestant upbringing seems to have given him an acute outsider's feel for American fiction. (Wood's ornery critiques of Thomas Pynchon and Don DeLillo do them more honor than most critics' praise.) Wood is least convincing when he codifies his taste--pretty much anything he likes he calls ""realistic,"" whether it's Gogol's ""Nose"" or Woolf's interior monologues--but this is rare. One often wonders what Wood's take would be on writers absent from these pages, Anthony Trollope, say, or Leo Tolstoy, William Gaddis or David Foster Wallace, who seem temperamentally matched to his concerns. In other words, one wants Wood reading over one's shoulder--and for a reviewer, that may be the highest possible praise. (June)
Reviewed on: 05/31/1999
Release date: 06/01/1999
Paperback - 284 pages - 978-0-375-75263-6

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